This is an interesting case of synchronicity, or maybe zeitgeist- I have found that as I get more and more proficient at producing melodies with my saw, and especially the more I play with and interact w/ other musicians (in a group), the more dyslexic I become.

I don't know if any of you guys eat ginkgo, but I do, and if I don't for a couple of weeks I forget the names of people I went to high school and college with, and when I resume taking ginkgo, I remember those names again (and various other things....) My point w/ the ginkgo is that rather than being oblivious, as psychologists have always assumed, people in general are exquisitely sensitive to things that affect their mental processes ("cognition").

The studies purporting to show a physical effect of musical education on the brain have been post-hoc and correlational, and have thus suffered from a self-selection bias- however this study, from my alma mater BTW: Music Modifies Brain Function gets around most of these problems by studying pre-schoolers...it is the best (peer-reviewed) evidence I know of that learning ANYTHING actually causes changes in the brain.....

Don't get me started on The Whorfian Hypothesis and "The Languages of Pao".......

Actually, read William James' "Principles of Psychology" where he discusses Francis Galton and the British Academy and visual memory....

North American psychology assumed for a century that the brain was fixed, and could only degrade...we're learning that the brain is MUCH more plastic....

Also, concerning evolution and reading, consider the case of "industrial melanism"- which demonstrates that evolutionary control can assert itself in many fewer generations than one would think (like "global warming", no?)..............


IF there were any Justice, Jack Vance would have won the Nobel Prize in Literature!